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Sidney Miller
Sidney Miller
Credits
Position Director
Biographical Information
Birthdate October 22, 1916
Birthplace Shenandoah, Pennsylvania, United States
Death Date January 10, 2004 (age 87)
Death Place Los Angeles, California, United States[1]

Sidney Miller was a director on Bewitched. He helmed the episode, "It's Magic" (1965).

Biography[]

Sidney Miller was an American actor, director and songwriter known for his touch with comedy and work with Donald O’Connor. He was born on October 22, 1916 in Shenandoah, Pennsylvania.

Beginning as a child and juvenile actor, Miller appeared in about one-hundred films, most notably with Mickey Rooney in 1938’s “Boys Town,” which won an Oscar for Spencer Tracy as Father Flanagan, and the movie’s sequel, “The Men of Boys Town.” He had an important supporting role as “Slow-Burn” in Billy Crystal’s 1988 film “Memories of Me.” He also voiced several cartoon characters for children’s television programs.

As a director, Miller guided episodes of such television series as “The Ann Sothern Show,” “The Real McCoys,” “My Favorite Martian,” “The Addams Family,” “Get Smart,” Marlo Thomas’ “That Girl,” and “The Mickey Mouse Club.” Miller was comedy consultant, writer and sketch director for “The Donny and Marie Osmond Show.” He memorably appeared as a drunk on episodes of “Dragnet” and wrote the song “Foggy Night in San Francisco” for the Jack Webb series.

Miller first paired with O’Connor for comedy sketches on the early 1950s television variety show “Colgate Comedy Hour,” and nearly two decades later produced “The Donald O’Connor Show.”

He remained O’Connor’s longtime partner, writing songs and sketches for the star’s musical motion pictures and television specials.

Sidney Miller died on January 10, 2004, in Los Angeles after a two-year bout with Parkinson’s disease. He was 87.[2]

References[]

  1. Sidney Miller on the Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on December 18, 2019.
  2. "Sidney Miller, 87; Prolific Actor, Director, Songwriter" obituary, Los Angeles Times, January 17, 2004. Retrieved on September 23, 2021, edited.
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